ecklekctic:

Anna KarinaThat happened while we were shooting the picture in Geneva. It was a strange love story from the beginning. I could see Jean-Luc was looking at me all the time, and I was looking at him too, all day long.  We were like animals. One night we were at this dinner in Lausanne. My boyfriend, who was a painter, was there too. And suddenly I felt something under the table – it was Jean-Luc’s hand. He gave me a piece of paper and then left to drive back to Geneva. I went into another room to see what he’d written.  It said, “I love you.  Rendezvous at midnight at the Café de la Prez.” And then my boyfriend came into the room and demanded to see the piece of paper, and he took my arm and grabbed it and read it.  He said, “You’re not going.” And I said, “I am.” And he said, “But you can’t do this to me.”  I said, “But I’m in love too, so I’m going.” But he still didn’t believe me. We drove back to Geneva and I started to pack my tiny suitcase.  He said, “Tell me you’re not going.” And I said, “I’ve been in love with him since I saw him the second time. And I can’t do anything about it.” It was like something electric. I walked there, and I remember my painter was running after me crying. I was, like, hypnotized – it never happened again to me in my life.

So I get to the Cafe de la Prez, and Jean-Luc was sitting there reading a paper, but I don’t think he was really reading it. I just stood there in front of him for what seemed like an hour but I guess was not more than thirty seconds. Suddenly he stopped reading and said,” Here you are. Shall we go?” So we went to his hotel. The next morning when I woke up he wasn’t there. I got very worried. I took a shower, and then he came back about an hour later with the dress I wore in the film - the white dress with flowers. And it was my size, perfect. It was like my wedding dress.

We carried on shooting the film, and, of course, my painter left. When the picture was finished, I went back to Paris with Jean-Luc, Michel Subor, who was the main actor, and Laszlo Szabo, who was also in the film, in Jean-Luc’s American car. We were all wearing dark glasses and we got stopped at the border – I guess they thought we were gangsters. When we arrived in Paris, Jean-Luc dropped the other two off and said to me, “Where are you going?”  I said, “I have to stay with you. You’re the only person I have in the world now.” And he said, “Oh my God.”

Keaton Henson - Grow Up With Me (Poem)
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weekendplaylist:

grow up with me (poem) // keaton henson

Grow up with me.
Let’s run in fields and fear the dark together.
Fall off swings and burn special things, and both play outside in bad weather.

Let’s eat badly.
Let’s watch adults drink wine and laugh at their idiocy.
Let’s sit in the back of the car,
making eye contact with strangers driving pass,
making them uncomfortable.

Not caring.
Not swearing.
Don’t fuck.

Let’s both reclaim our super powers;
the ones we all have and lose with out milk teeth.
The ability not to fear social awkwardness.
To panic when locked in the cellar; still sure there’s something down there. And while picking from pillows each feather,
let’s both stray away from the edge of the bed,
forcing us closer together.

Let’s sit in public with ice cream all over both our faces;
sticking our tongues out at passers by. Let’s cry.
Let’s swim.
Let’s everything.

Let’s not find it funny less someone falls over.
Classical music is boring.
Poetry baffles us both;
there’s nothing that’s said is what’s meant.
Plays are long, tiresome, sullen, and filled;
with hours that can be spent rolling down hills,
and grazing our knees on cement.

Let’s hear stories and both lose our innocence.
Learn about parents and forgiveness, death and mortality,
kindness and art,
thus losing both our innocent hearts,
but at least we won’t do it apart.

Grow up with me.

Annie Leibovitz exhibition in Singapore. I exceptionally love William S. Burroughs portrait and all of Susan Sontag’s photos. And also a nude photo of pregnant Annie taken by Susan.

stoptellingwomentosmile:

This video was shot and edited by Dean Peterson
Dean and I got in contact a few months ago. He liked the project, I liked his work, and so we made this video that documents the process behind creating STWTS posters. 

It’s important for me to show the process behind creating these pieces. Each portrait is an actual woman who has a story, who goes through this treatment daily, who has something to say about it that deserves to be heard. 

I initially decided to portray the women as drawings instead of photographs because it was my natural inclination as a portrait painter. But also, drawing someone’s portrait makes you really look at them. You have to recognize their humanity not just physically but personally. And I hope that’s what comes across when people see these portraits in the street. 

I’m rambling. Watch the video. 
Thanks to Zahira and Koku for talking so candidly with me. 

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TF